Purdue Outing Club – Standard Operating Procedures

Purdue Outing Club – Standard Operating Procedures

General Operations

Backpacking

Gear Checkout

Trip Leading

Caving

Gear Checkout

Trip Leading

Kayaking

Gear Checkout

Gear Lost

Gear Transportation

Gear Return and Cleaning Procedure

Roll Session

Trips and River Running

Trip Leading

Drivers and Car Owners

Mountain Biking

Gear Checkout

Trip Leading

Rock Climbing

Gear Checkout

Trip Leading

Traditional “Trad” Climbing

Multipitch Climbing

Orienteering

Gear Checkout

Trip Leading

POC Gear Closet

Disciplinary Actions

General Operations

Below are the requirements and procedures that must be met to be considered an official/active member of the Purdue Outing Club, check out equipment, and lead trips:

     A Club Sports Waiver must be signed.

     A Purdue Outing Club Agreement Form must be signed.

     Club dues must be paid($25 for a school year).

     Gear may only be checked out for a single individual’s use. No checking out gear for another member/non-member. Club Sports Consultants are exempt from this rule.

 

When returning gear, all gear must be returned by the individual who checked out the equipment.

     Gear may only be checked out by a designated gear consultant.

     Gear must be checked for cleanliness, dryness and that all pieces are included when equipment is returned.

 

The following are extra restrictions placed on sport specific gear:

Backpacking

Gear Checkout

In order to check out the following gear, member must be able to do the following:

     Stoves

     have knowledge of type of stove,

     be able to use safely and correctly

     Water treatment equipment

     have knowledge of equipment,

     be able to clean equipment properly before returning

     Backpacks

     treat respectfully and clean as possible

     Sleeping pad

     avoid at all possible risk of puncture, including keeping away from fire

     Sleeping bag

     treat respectfully, keep dry and air out before returned to gear closet

     Tent

     clean and dry thoroughly after use

 

Trip Leading

Before leading a trip, member should be proficient in the following

     reading a map

     start and maintain a responsible fire

     first aid information

     equipment repair

     group management

     Leave No Trace practices

     emergency protocol

     have knowledge of area in question, specific risks, and regulations

Caving

Gear Checkout

     Helmets, knee pads, and headlamps can be checked out with consent of one or both of the caving consultants. Ropes, ascenders, or any other gear cannot be checked out by anyone but the consultants themselves.

Trip Leading

     The caving consultants are allowed to lead trips. Experienced cavers can meet with the consultants to be considered for leading additional and will be considered on a case by case basis.

     Leading a trip requires being familiar with a cave, this includes knowing the entrance, exit and the path in between as well as any harder obstacles and the safest way to get past them. Consultants need to be comfortable crawling in small spaces, climbing over obstacles, and being in cold water.

     In leading a trip one needs to adhere to the following guidelines; provide all the helmets and headlights, bring extra headlights/batteries and water,  Stay together keeping within a shouts distance, and stop periodically to rest/catch up and account for all persons.

     Make nothing but memories, kill nothing but time, take nothing but pictures,leave nothing but footprints.

     When choosing a cave, consultants must be aware of cave closures and restrictions and follow them accordingly.

 

Kayaking

Revised November 5th, 2014

Gear Checkout

Below are the sport specific restrictions for checking out Kayaking gear:

     No kayaking gear will be checked out without knowledge and consent of at least two club kayaking consultants.

     Club gear will be checked out only for use by POC members.

     Club gear checked out has to be returned clean and in good condition before the following roll session.

     When returned, club gear will be cleaned (*refer to cleaning procedure below) and replaced neatly into its designated spot in the kayaking storage area.

     Club kayaking gear includes: boats, PFD's (personal flotation devices), paddles, spray skirts, helmets, splash jackets, boat outfitting, throw ropes, raft + rafting equipment, and wetsuits.

     Any gear checked out by any member without the approval of at least two kayaking consultants will be considered as stolen. Failure to return the gear in previously inspected conditions by the kayaking consultants in a reasonable time provided by the kayaking consultants will result in the suspension of club membership and be held responsible for the replacement of club gear. Purdue University DRS (Division of Recreational Sports) and ODOS (Office of Dean of Students) may be notified depending of the severity of the matter as judged by the kayaking consultants and the current president of the club.

     Gear checked out shall be used ONLY for kayaking, on water, and must not be used for any other purposes unless if deemed appropriate by two or more kayaking consultants.

Gear Lost

Below are the sport specific restrictions for lost Kayaking gear:

     If gear is lost, broken, or damaged, this information will be quickly communicated to the kayaking consultants.

     Lost gear will be charged towards user unless gear is lost in a dangerous situation (due to safety reasons), e.g. when a paddle is lost due to a swim, getting caught in an underwater sieve in strong current that is not retrievable.

     Lost gear due to negligence will be charged at full cost for replacement towards the user, e.g. forgetting a paddle at the take out, or letting the current flush an improperly secured boat downstream and losing it.

     Lost/pinned gear on the river will be retrieved with the best effort without jeopardizing the safety of any other paddlers and individuals.

Gear Transportation

Below are the sport specific restrictions for transporting Kayaking gear:

     Kayaks to be transported with roof racks must be strapped down securely.

     An extra safety strap is highly recommended for each tie-down.

     Skirts must NOT be on the kayaks while sandwiching the kayaks together to prevent the skirts from tearing.

Gear Return and Cleaning Procedure

Below are the sport specific restrictions for returning and cleaning Kayaking gear:

     Fill one trash can with baby shampoo and water, this will be the wash bucket.

     Fill the other trash can(s) with water only, these will be the rinse buckets.

     All neoprene items and PFDs will be washed by soaking in the wash bucket for at least 5 minutes then being thoroughly rinsed in the rinse buckets.  If extra rinsing is needed use the hose until all soap has left the neoprene.

     Helmets can be washed in the above manner or with the hydrogen peroxide.

     The boats and paddles will then be hosed down.

     After the initial rinse, the hydrogen peroxide solution will be applied to the boats and paddles.

     Rinse all boats and paddles again to remove all traces of dirt and hydrogen peroxide.

     Cleaning check: no leaves, twigs, branches, dirt, sand in boats

     All gear will then be hung up nicely in the closet to dry.

     Once the gear has dried put it away nicely in the lockers or its’ respective place.

     DO NOT put wet gear in the lockers or on the ground.

Roll Session

Below are the sport specific restrictions for Kayaking Roll Sessions:

     Attendees must have done the swim test required by the BAC (Boilermaker Aquatic Center) to be allowed in a kayak or the dive pool during roll session.

     Roll sessions will be only held with the presence of at least one Kayaker-in-Charge (K.i.C.). A K.i.C. is a kayaking consultant or a specific individual appointed by a kayaking consultant to lead the respective roll session.

     At least two individuals (including one K.i.C.) must be in the vicinity of the location of which roll session is held (dive pool) the entire duration, for which roll session is held, to have participants in the water with kayaks.

     Whatever has been taken out from the storage closet for the use at roll session must be returned and properly placed at their designated spots by the end of roll session.

     Read the following for more restrictions of the BAC.

     Rec Sports Facility Policies

Trips and River Running

Below are the sport specific restrictions for Trips and River Running:

     Every paddler running a river should have read and fully understood the following texts:

     Safety Code of American Whitewater

     Purdue Outing Club, Purdue University, or any other individuals will not be held liable for any lost of personal belongings, injuries, or death that could occur during a trip.

     Every paddler joining a trip must have consulted and have been approved by two or more kayaking consultants.

     Any trips done alone or without any kayaking consultants must have been approved by two or more kayaking consultants to use club gear.

Trip Leading

Below are the sport specific restrictions for leading a Kayaking trip:

     At least two rescuers will be the trip leaders for each kayaking trip.

     Ratio of rescuer to beginner (or non-rescuer) for a kayaking trip will be at most 1:3; a rescuer is an individual acknowledged by all of the kayaking consultants to have been equipped with the essential swiftwater rescue equipment, knowledge and ability.

     A rescuer is defined as such:

     A rescuer is equipped with but not limited to a rescue PFD with tow tether, throw/rescue rope(s), locking carabiner(s) and first-aid medical kit,

     has the knowledge to read and run whitewater rapids well and have a full understanding of the hazards on the runs on the respective trip,

     has the full confidence to successfully run the whitewater rapids on the respective trip,

     has the ability to perform a T-rescue and/or a hand-of-god on a capsized kayak with or without a responsive or unresponsive kayaker, and/or to rescue a swimmer by towing him/her to safety, on any run, all minimizing the risk towards the rescuer himself/herself and other trip members/paddlers on the respective trip and the river,

     has at least a basic first aid and CPR training and certification, and

     is acknowledged/appointed by all of the kayaking consultants to be a rescuer.

     Trip leaders will be aware of the extent of the abilities of all trip members and will keep everyone on the trip informed of the difficulties/dangers on the runs of the trip will present.

     Trip leaders will review available guidebooks/literature about the trip destination so as to be aware of all known hazards before the trip.

     Trip leaders will be responsible for providing a comprehensive safety briefing before every trip.

Drivers and Car Owners

Below are the sport specific guide for Drivers and Car Owners during a Kayaking trip:

     Trip drivers must be certified by Purdue DRS, more info for certification here: http://www.purdue.edu/recsports/programs/club_sports/driver_authorization.php

     The cost of gas for a regular kayaking trip is usually

     split between all passengers and driver in the vehicle if the vehicle carrying all the individuals also carries all the gear used by all the individuals in the respective vehicle, or

     split between all participants of the kayaking trip if one or more vehicles carry gear (especially kayaks)  for the passengers in other vehicles.

     The way of splitting cost of gas required for the trip has to be unanimously agreed upon by all participants of the trip, preferably prior to the beginning of the respective trip.

     Due to the nature of the abuse that is made to the car being used for hauling kayaks during kayaking trips, the owner of the vehicle used for hauling kayaks reserves the right to add an additional charge of up to the double of the cost that is required for vehicle service for the miles driven during a trip.

     For example, if a trip totals to 1000 miles, and the cost of maintenance for the vehicle used for hauling kayaks is $50 every 5000 miles, the car owner/driver reserves the right to add an extra $20 (double the cost of vehicle service, =$50*(1000 mi/5000mi)*2) on top of the cost for gas, as a compensation for vehicle service, cleaning and wear-and-tear.

Mountain Biking

Gear Checkout

Below are the sport specific restrictions for Biking gear:

     The bike stand and tools are to be used only by consultants, though the bike pump can be checked out only for outgoing trips.

     Only one bike per Outing Club member may be checked out.

     If a bike is checked out overnight, they must be able to store it overnight in their place of residence.

     Make sure each rider has a helmet (if they have their own that is acceptable, but make sure to offer one with each bike checked out from the closet)

     It is required to know the bike’s functions (including proper brake and shifter usage as well as fork lockout) before checking out a bike.

     Bike checkouts must be approved firsthand by mountain biking consultants.

     It is required to go on at least one trip led by a mountain biking consultant before checking out a bike.

     Report all crashes and possible bike damage to any mountain biking consultant.

     In the event of crashes all broken parts will be dealt with on a case by case basis.

     Members must know not to ride bikes on trails if they are muddy or wet. It puts ruts in the trail, ruining the trail and reflects poorly on the club. 

     This can be anywhere from the next day to more than a week depending on trail conditions. Users must use discretion, if bikes are leaving ruts turn back and wait longer.

Trip Leading

Below are the sport specific restrictions for leading a biking trip:

     Common knowledge of bike maintenance is required, including:

     correct tire pressure·for the rider

     correct seat height

     cleaning and lubricating the chain

     appropriate fork settings for riding conditions

     changing tires/innertubes

     basic emergency maintenance

     Be considered an intermediate/advanced rider by mountain biking consultants

     Be familiar with the trail you will be leading the trip on.  It is recommended to carry a trail map.

     Keep track of each rider participating in the trip.

     Know your riders’ abilities, and keep safety in mind.

     Make sure each rider has a helmet, water and food if necessary 

     Leave no trace!

     DO NOT LEAD TRIPS IF THE TRAILS ARE WET OR MUDDY! IT WILL RUIN THEM!

 

 

        

Rock Climbing

Gear Checkout

Below are the sport specific restrictions for Climbing gear:

     Anyone may check out a harness, climbing shoes, and helmet

     To receive a belay device they must be seen using the device correctly, this can be done by showing climbing consultant that they know how to belay.

     Rope and Draws, need to have been seen lead climbing and belaying correctly.

     Climbing: Can correctly clip into quickdraws (NO backclipping or z-clipping). Can clip well with either hand. Does not step through the rope. Clips in a safe area (head to chest). Know climbing communications. Knows how to “Clean”.

     Belayer: Can feed and take up slack quickly. Break hand always stays on the break end of rope. Stands in safe area to “catch” climber.

     Crash Pads, need to know proper spotting technique

     Spotting: Wide, staggered stance, hands up, arms bent, ready to push boulderer onto pad.

     Decided by current climbing consultant.

Trip Leading

Below are the sport specific restrictions for leading a climbing trip:

     Trip leaders must be proficient at lead climbing, lead belaying, and cleaning a route.

     There must be an additional person on the trip who also is proficient at lead climbing, lead belaying, and cleaning a route. This is so that one person does not have to lead and clean each route as well as having a safe belayer.

     The maximum number of novice climbers to experienced lead certified climbers must be 5:1 and in each group going to a climbing area there must be at least 2 experienced lead certified climbers.

     The trip leader should have knowledge of the climbing area and if has incomplete knowledge, they have a guidebook for reference

     Must practice Leave No Trace Ethics

     Trip leaders should inform all trip participants of Leave No Trace Ethics including how to defecate in the woods

     Trip leaders should have complete knowledge of all of the gear to be used include proper placement of quickdraws or traditional climbing gear

     Trip leaders must know how to generate safe sport climbing anchors. Each trip leader must demonstrate this technique to a climbing consultant prior to leading a trip.

     Trip leaders must be able to inspect all of the climbing gear in order to identify if any gear is not safe to climb on.

     Trip leaders must be able to inspect the routes for safety concerns including potential rockfall, bad fixed gear, bees etc.

     If there is a large climbing group going to to Muir Valley in the Red River Gorge you MUST inform the Webbers of the size of the group and intended crags at least 3 days prior to the scheduled trip

     Trip leaders must be aware of the number of climbers going to a single crag. They should minimize the numbers at one particular spot in order to avoid overcrowding or monopolizing an area

     Trip leaders should be courteous to other climbers and not monopolize routes especially popular moderate climbs

     If camping after climbing, the trip leader should follow the rules and regulations laid out in the backpacking section of this document

 

 

Traditional “Trad” Climbing

Below are the sport specific restrictions for checking out any traditional climbing gear:

     Any person who desires to check out the trad rack from the gear closet must demonstrate the following to a climbing consultant prior to being able to check out the trad rack:

     Complete knowledge regarding the gear that they intend on renting. This includes proper placement of active and passive gear. In addition the renter must be proficient in leading as well as anchor building.

     Must know how to rappel.

     Must be able to independently inspect the trad rack for any wear and tear that poses a safety concern. Must be able to identify if a piece of equipment is unsafe to climb on.

     Any person who desires to trad climb must follow the following restrictions

     Must wear a helmet at all times while climbing and belaying

     Must have a belayer who knows how to lead belay, preferably have trad climbing experience. The belayer also must wear a helmet at all times.

     Must practice Leave No Trace Ethics

     Trad climbers must inspect the routes for safety concerns including potential rockfall, bad fixed gear, bees etc.

     Failure to follow these rules will lead to suspension of privileges to check out the trad rack for 2 weeks (first offense) or permanently (second offense)

 

The following skills should be conveyed from an experienced trad climber to a novice trad climber

     The proper placement of various active and passive forms of protection

     Under which conditions you would favor certain forms of protection

     How to identify the quality of rock and under which conditions would you avoid placing gear (i.e. avoid placing protection in rotten or hollow rock)

     How to build SERENE anchors (solid, equalized, redundant, efficient, and no extension)

     Proper jamming techniques

     How to rappel properly

     How to use back up rappelling knots (prusick or Klemheist)

     How to inspect a route for potential dangers such as rockfall

 

Multipitch Climbing

Below are the sport specific restrictions for multi-pitch climbing:

     Any person who desires to climb a multiple pitch sport or trad route must demonstrate the following skills to a climbing consultant

     Must demonstrate the ability to climb at or above the grade of the hardest pitch of the intended route

     Must have knowledge of how to build safe anchors

     Must have knowledge of alternative rappel techniques in case of a dropped belay device (aka Munter hitch)

     Must be able to rappel

     Any person who desires to climb a multiple pitch sport or trad route must follow the following rules

     Depending on on the length of the intended route, the climber must bring enough food and water

     Must practice Leave No Trace Ethics

     Multi pitch climbers must inspect the routes for safety concerns including potential rockfall, bad fixed gear, bees etc.

The following skills should be conveyed from an experienced multipitch sport/trad climber to a novice climber

     The proper placement of various active and passive forms of protection

     Under which conditions you would favor certain forms of protection

     How to identify the quality of rock and under which conditions would you avoid placing gear (i.e. avoid placing protection in rotten or hollow rock)

     How to build SERENE anchors (solid, equalized, redundant, efficient, and no extension)

     Proper jamming techniques

     How to rappel properly emphasizing tying a knot at the end of the rappel rope

     How to use back up rappelling knots (prusick or Klemheist)

     How to inspect a route for potential dangers such as rockfall

     How to efficiently climb a multipitch route

     How to prepare for a multipitch route

     Identify how long the route will take

     Will you need extra food/ water

     Identify alternative routes of descent in case of emergency

     What information should be left with a contact not going on the trip (what route you plan on climbing, when you should return, who to call if you don’t return by then)

     What should you do in case of emergency

     Incapacitated climber

     Broken bone or other non life threatening injury

 

Orienteering

Gear Checkout

Below are the sport specific restrictions for Orienteering gear:

     Any person can rent a club compass, UTM Plotters, and GPS.

     Approval by the POCAR Coordinator is needed for the club maps due to potential trips going out where they are needed or based on skill (beginner orienteering skills are needed to rent maps).

     Checking out orienteering flags must have prior approval of the POCAR Coordinator.

Trip Leading

Below are the sport specific restrictions for leading an Orienteering trip:

     A basic knowledge of orienteering is required to lead a trip.  This can be from attendance on a beginner trip or through the proving of one’s abilities to the consultant or POCAR Coordinator. 

     The leading of a trip by someone other than the consultant or the POCAR Coordinator must have prior approval of one of these two and is dealt with on an individual basis.

     The individual under consideration must know how to read a map and compass, and set bearings.  They should also understand how to find the best approach method to a point and to be able to read the landscape.

     They should also know basic first aid skills, and be able to hike at least 10 miles.  They should know what equipment is necessary for long hikes (boots, wool (not cotton) clothing, long pants, sufficient water and day back types.

 

 

POC Gear Closet

 

In order for a person to check gear out from the POC gear closet the following procedure must be followed.

 

     The renter must be a POC members who are current on their dues.

     This member list will be maintained by the POC Treasurer and be in the form of a Google document that is shared amongst the POC executive board and the gear consultants.

     For sport specific gear checkout, the renter must meet the specifications laid out in the POC Standard Operating Procedure (POC SOP).

     The renter will be allowed to check out gear for 1 week. After one week a reminder email will be sent to the renter by the gear consultants. If the gear has not been returned after 2 weeks the renter’s name will be sent to the club director for disciplinary action.

     The renter must return the gear clean, dry, and properly stored (tents). If gear is not in returnable condition as deemed by the consultant, the gear will remain in the renters possession until it has been cleaned and can be returned. If gear is again brought back in unacceptable condition, disciplinary action will be taken.

     The renter must alert the gear consultants if the gear was malfunctioning or missing parts and pieces. Failure to do so or returning gear that is known to be faulty will result in disciplinary action.

     If the renter loses a piece of gear or breaks the gear beyond normal wear and tear, they must pay for the replacement piece.

     The weekly schedule of openings can be found here: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0Ar0MK_FiAnAXdDVYTjB3UDlZODJCenY1MElPUWpMbUE&usp=sharing

     Additional openings can be arranged by emailing one of the gear consultants.

     If the gear is not returned in cleaned condition in the two week time frame, the renter will be held responsible for the gear. Either the gear must be returned ASAP or it will be considered purchased/stolen and the renter must pay to have the item replaced.

     The renter can only check out gear for themselves, only the consultants can check out gear for a group

 

Disciplinary Actions

     1st offence - 2 weeks of gear rental privileges revoked.

     2nd offence - remainder of semester gear rental privileges revoked.

     3rd offence - Gear rental privileges are permanently revoked.